LSD cures depression? Scientists plead for cash to fund ‘exciting’ drug study

To date, the project has been partially funded by Imperial College London and the Beckley Foundation. However, researchers are now in need of £25,000 to analyze scans.

Scientists belief LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) can be used to treat addictions, depression and chronic pain.

So far, 20 healthy volunteers, including 15 men and 5 women, were injected with 75 microgram of LSD. Their brain activity was then scanned to review the effects.
 

 

Magic mushrooms ‘less harmful than thought’ , says leading psychiatrist

Researchers are beginning to look again at how LSD and psilocybin – the active compound in magic mushrooms – might be of benefit in the treatment of addiction, for obsessive compulsive disorder and even, according to one small Swiss study, to alleviate the symptoms of anxiety in terminally ill patients.

However, writing in the BMJ, psychiatrist Dr James Rucker, said that no evidence had ever shown the drugs to be habit-forming. There is also little evidence of harm when used in controlled settings, and a wealth of studies indicating that they have uses in the treatment of common psychiatric disorders, he said.

 Curated from Magic mushrooms ‘less harmful than thought’ and should be reclassified, says leading psychiatrist – Health News – Health & Families – The Independent

LSD cures depression? Scientists plead for cash to fund ‘exciting’ drug study

The study, carried out as part of a psychedelic research project by neuroscientists at Imperial College London, is expected to “revolutionize” scientists understanding of the brain.

To date, the project has been partially funded by Imperial College London and the Beckley Foundation. However, researchers are now in need of £25,000 to analyze scans.

 

 

Healing trip: how psychedelic drugs could help treat depression

It’s time to end the 50-year ban on magic mushrooms and LSD and allow potential health benefits to be explored, researchers say

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